Best Wooden Toys for Babies and Young Children

I’m one of those mean mothers who doesn’t want her aesthetic sensibilities offended by blinking plastic toys all over the living room. But, in an effort to prove that my heart isn’t completely dry and shriveled, I do allow tasteful, wooden playthings to cozy up next to the plants and furniture.

The Plan Toy Chalet Dollhouse with furniture ($179.46) won’t fit in Audrey’s bedroom, so it lives right on the living room floor. This toy has endured as one of her favorite-ever Christmas presents. She received it two years ago now and plays with it almost daily. It makes future gift-giving easy for relatives, too, because there are always more accessories to add to it.


Audrey loves the Plan Toy doll house nursery ($15.49), which brings a little wooden baby to the household.

And of course you can’t play with the dollhouse without The Plan Toy Modern Doll Family ($12.22). The Melissa and Doug wooden family doll set ($16.06) look pretty cute, too.

Aside from the dollhouse, the wooden toys that have gotten the most mileage around here are the wooden food playsets. Audrey has had the Melissa and Doug Cutting Food Box ($15) and the Melissa and Doug Food Groups ($13.59) for years now.

We never had the space for a wooden kitchen, but the  Kidkraft Suite Elite kitchen ($109) looks like a great deal. Last year we posted a round-up of wooden kitchens you will want to check out.

For babies, I’d recommend old-fashioned wooden blocks (starting around $12). Audrey has had a set since birth and still gets them out and plays with them sometimes. Ditto for the wooden stacking rings (starting around $8).

This year I may surprise my five-year-old with the Melissa and Doug Shape, Model, and Mold ($15).

What are your (oh, and your children’s) favorite wooden toys?

Comments

  1. Can’t forget the Haba toys!

  2. I bought my son the Melissa & Doug wooden shape sorting clock (http://www.amazon.com/Melissa-Doug-Wooden-Shape-Sorting/dp/B000GKATU0/) for Christmas when he was 2 and obsessed with clocks. It was his favorite present that year. He is now 5 and still plays with it–and now we can use it to start teaching him how to tell time.

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