Poopy Cloth Diapers Solutions: Avoiding the Toilet Dunk

The concept of cloth diapers is glorious and hip, until you start thinking of solid waste. Many people can’t make it past the mental hurdle of the toilet dunk and give up on cloth before they ever start.

Here’s a shocking revelation: did you know that ALL poo-laden diapers, even disposables are supposed to be dunked in water? There is actually a written note on every box of disposables recommending that solid waste be rinsed off before disposal. After all, who wants human waste to be sitting in a landfill? (Even greener disposables like Seventh Generation recommend a toilet dunk with solid waste.)

A few toilet dunks are inevitable, but you may be surprised by just how often you can bypass the icky chore in favor of our slacker cloth diapering alternatives. Here are tips for every stage of solid waste your baby will produce.

Milk based poop: If baby dines on breast milk alone, the solid waste does not need to be rinsed before the diapers hit the washing machine. In fact, you can simply store them in a dry pail with a few squirts of Bac Out on each diaper. For formula fed babies, solid waste will have a stronger odor and may need a few extra doses of Bac Out. If you’re grossed out by the fact that poopy diapers will then have to be loaded into the washer, wear rubber gloves or simply dump the pail in the washing tub to avoid contact.

Baby food poop: There are two toilet dunking alternatives. Either use a flushable diaper liner liner to shield the diaper or install a diaper sprayer onto your toilet. My hesitations on flushable diaper liners were that they seemed to ensure that more poop ended up all over my baby’s bottom and I wasn’t confident enough in my plumbing to actually flush them. They are slightly easier to dunk than a diaper and can actually be washed and reused, so you may find them helpful. Many parents find that a diaper sprayer is easy to install and can be purchased for far less if you buy the individual parts rather than a kit. This is a great video on installing your own diaper sprayer will save you about 30 dollars.

Solid food poop: This is the golden stage of cloth diapering. Solid waste is often firm enough to simply be dumped into the toilet with no dunking whatsoever. The diaper sprayer can come in handy at times when baby has loaded up on fruit or popcorn, but poopy diapers are so much easier overall at this stage.

Do you have any genius methods for avoiding the toilet dunk? How have you dealt with poopy cloth diapers? Anyone tried infant potty training? We accidentally figured out how to have our daughter pooping in the potty exclusively after seven months old and were happy to say goodbye to poopy diapers forever. I’ll be sharing her story in my next post!

Comments

  1. Yes, please do tell how you accidentially figured out how to have your 7 month old poop in the potty!

    I’m too busy/have my hands too full during the day to empty the diapers right then and there after changing. I have a bucket by the changing table that I can quickly drop the dirty, but folded shut, diapers into and save til after baby goes to bed (I know that sounds nasty leaving them there). I’ve found that by the end of the day, the moisture from the poop (baby and solid food poop) has wicked out into the prefold diaper or pocket diaper insert (we use both) and the poop can sortof be peeled off without needing a rinse. I just sortof fold the diaper in half and rub the dirty surfaces together with my hands on the outside non-soiled surfaces so I don’t touch the poop. But, there are still times a bad diaper will need a quick rinse from our home made sprayer.

  2. I dry pail the diapers and when it’s time for laundering, take the poop diapers to the toilet. I scrape out the poop with a table knife and flush. I bought a special knife for it at a thrift store and keep it by the toilet just for this purpose. It’s not the best job in the world but I only have to deal with it twice a week when I do the diaper laundry and I haven’t had issues with staining. I use bumgenius diapers.

  3. I keep an empty gatorade bottle in the bathroom and fill it wiith water as needed to spray the poopy diapers (which we have very few of because my daughter prefers to go in her potty since she was 3 months) . I usually only spray 1 or 2 diapers per month.

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